Can I be a Feminist?

mothers marchThere are special people in this world. We don’t ask to be special. We’re just born this way.

-Push

I was recently reading an excellently written short article that spoke directly to feelings that have forming within me for some months.  I encourage you to read it here:

http://oxfordstudent.com/2013/12/17/im-not-a-feminist-and-it-is-not-my-job-to-be-one/

In essence the author says that as a man he does not feel he can be a feminist even though he supports the goals of the feminist movement.  In essence this is because he has neither been raised as female or lives as a female in this society, therefore he cannot have the shared experience of female gender oppression that is necessary to comprehend the feminist position and so  cannot take a meaningful role in the strategy to combat it.  He can however act as an ally in assisting feminists to achieve their aims

I recognise much of what is being said here because I am a white middle class male who was not raised female.  Unlike the author I have experienced societal discrimination due to my innate attributes but in my case it is because I am manic depressive and not because I have lived as a female.  So, can I truly be a feminist or should I cast myself in the more marginal role of a feminist ally?

The answer to my titular question is heavily reliant upon the often fluid definition of what feminism and feminists actually are.

If the definition is taken from the dictionary we see feminism as “the advocacy of women’s rights on the ground of the equality of the sexes.” (although I’d prefer equality of the genders).  Such a definition clearly allows non-females to be feminists.

However, if we go to an extreme separatist feminist viewpoint – “”Life” in this “society” being, at best, an utter bore and no aspect of “society” being at all relevant to women, there remains to civic-minded, responsible, thrill-seeking females only to overthrow the government, eliminate the money system, institute complete automation and eliminate the male sex.” (SCUM Manifesto) then I most certainly cannot be a feminist.

Of course most groups lie between the extremes of complete equality for males within a feminist movement and the outright rejection of males in their entirety. In my experience feminist groups lean strongly toward acceptance of men who have developed an understanding of the nature of patriarchal oppression and demonstrated a willingness to learn from the oppression of others.

What I take from this is, as with all movements, feminism is factionalised and I am welcome (or even encouraged) in some areas whilst being rejected in others.  A situation not so different from any other collective organisation in this world.

For me personally it is feminist groups that have adopted ideas based around the intersectional feminism of Kimberlé Crenshaw, bell hooks and others that speak most credibly to the topic of making successful and realistic alterations to society to achieve female equality (and, hand in hand with this, racial, disability and many other equalities).  Within this context I can be a feminist and, even if I choose not to be one, I have a duty to engage with feminism from the the viewpoint of the oppressions that I experience. This is because a final feminist equality must necessarily include a liberation of men from patriarchal oppression alongside the liberation of people of colour, mental disability and many other oppressed groups.

It is this intersectional definition of feminism that speaks most clearly to me.  To my eye it is a definition of feminism that transcends feminism itself in that it acknowledges that we live in a society that includes powerful inbuilt negative influences on multiple groups on the basis of gender, sexuality, religion, mental disability, physical disability, race and many other aspects of normal human variation.  With that understanding it becomes clear that each of us is to some extent oppressed and to some extent an oppressor.  Each of us has a duty to attempt to locate ourselves within the web of oppression and aid each other in extracting ourselves as best we are able.

To successfully end discrimination against any group will require the dismantling of significant aspects of the current societal power structures and replacing them with new structures better designed to promote equality. Dismantling the power structure is too great a job for any single oppressed group acting on its own and building a viable alternative is impossible for a single group as it will automatically incorporate the invisible oppressions inherent to that group.  We may well achieve a society that is equal for women, but it will not be equal with respect to race and other oppressions unless we have previously embraced and learned from those groups.  A truly equal society can only stem from multiple oppressed groups that have acknowledged the fact that their societally inherited viewpoints are often oppressive to others and strive to find a way to work together without mutually oppressing each other.  When that goal has been achieved these combined groups will not only have a more comprehensive understanding of how to build an equal society but will have the strength of numbers necessary to achieve meaningful societal change.

So.  Can I be a feminist?  On current reflection I believe a feminist is not something you are or something that you think, I believe it is something that you do.  When I am holding a placard or taking some other action to support equality of the genders then I am a feminist.  When I am campaigning for the rights of the disabled I am a disability rights activist.  When I am working with the homeless then I am a human rights activist.  When I am sitting at home then I am just me, I still have my views and beliefs on all these things but they are intermingled and can no longer be easily attributed to a single viewpoint.  I choose not to label them unless they are in action.

Addendum.

The Oxford Feminist Network, of which I am a member, adopted the following guiding statement:

“This group is for any person of any gender identity in Oxford and all are welcome to be members whether you are just beginning to explore feminism or whether you have decided your views. This group is about recognising that feminism is an inherently political movement connected to and through lots of other social justice movements and challenging other forms of inequality. We meet once a month in Oxford for discussions, activism planning and networking and at other times to conduct events, protests and projects. The Facebook site is an adjunct to face to face meetings. 

“We aim to be an accessible group; to meet at accessible venues and put up information and important points raised in our meetings for those unable to attend. 

“We are still learning to challenge our own learned prejudices. If someone in the group has said something or done something prejudiced or discriminatory, please feel free and safe to raise the issue without retribution (either directly or with the moderators) and we will all work to resolve it. Be respectful, encouraging and kind.”

I believe this statement marks the first step along the right path for many of us.

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2 Comments on “Can I be a Feminist?”

  1. Mike says:

    Interesting parallel between this and the “abuse without abuse” piece


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